My Heart

this is a map of my heart
the land of my father
my mothers world
treat it kindly read it with care
you can do a lot of damage here

Grand Ole Party - New Medication

“Always remember that the crowd that applauds your coronation is the same crowd that will applaud your beheading. People like a show.”

—    Terry Pratchett (via dusselchen)

(via ifbeautyisterror)

softwaring:

South Tyrolean Alps

Lukas Furlan

(via penthesileas)

(Source: zeeewok, via feministsorgnow)

vandenio:

Vilnelė river, Lithuania

vandenio:

Vilnelė river, Lithuania

(via proserpin)

jenniferrpovey:

ultrafacts:

Source Want more facts?, follow the Ultrafacts Blog

50 species of lizard and one species of snake reproduce through parthenogenesis (that’s the fancy word for producing offspring as a female without having sex).
Except.
Whiptails are stimulation ovulators. That is to say, they can’t ovulate without having sex.
So not only do they are give birth through immaculate conception, they’re ALL LESBIANS.
There are two kinds of parthenogenesis seen in reptiles. That used by whiptails and the other all female species is true cloning - the egg contains the female’s full genetic material).
Other species including komodo dragons use another form of parthenogenesis where they actually fertilize themselves, with a haploid polar body used instead of a sperm. Because of the way reptile sex chromosomes work, this form of parthenogenesis can produce males as well as females - however, the females produced have weird sex chromosomes and can only lay other females. It’s used as a backup reproductive strategy if they can’t find a mate. This works because in reptiles, unlike mammals, its the males that have two sex chromosomes the same (ZZ) and the females different (ZW). Females produced by parthenogenesis are WW - and that’s what happened to the whiptails. They lost the Z chromosome and now are all WWs.
IOW?
Reptiles are fascinating.

jenniferrpovey:

ultrafacts:

Source Want more facts?, follow the Ultrafacts Blog

50 species of lizard and one species of snake reproduce through parthenogenesis (that’s the fancy word for producing offspring as a female without having sex).

Except.

Whiptails are stimulation ovulators. That is to say, they can’t ovulate without having sex.

So not only do they are give birth through immaculate conception, they’re ALL LESBIANS.

There are two kinds of parthenogenesis seen in reptiles. That used by whiptails and the other all female species is true cloning - the egg contains the female’s full genetic material).

Other species including komodo dragons use another form of parthenogenesis where they actually fertilize themselves, with a haploid polar body used instead of a sperm. Because of the way reptile sex chromosomes work, this form of parthenogenesis can produce males as well as females - however, the females produced have weird sex chromosomes and can only lay other females. It’s used as a backup reproductive strategy if they can’t find a mate. This works because in reptiles, unlike mammals, its the males that have two sex chromosomes the same (ZZ) and the females different (ZW). Females produced by parthenogenesis are WW - and that’s what happened to the whiptails. They lost the Z chromosome and now are all WWs.

IOW?

Reptiles are fascinating.

(via villainessy)

David Bowie - 'Heroes'/'Helden'

nickdrake:

David Bowie Heroes, in German from Christiane F OST (1981).

(Source: David Bowie, via polyvinylchlorid)

putdownthepotato:

Glendalough, Co. Wicklow, Ireland by Paul Moore

putdownthepotato:

Glendalough, Co. Wicklow, Ireland by Paul Moore

(via penthesileas)

medievalpoc:

Anonymous

Black Madonna [Zwarte madonna]

Netherlands (1650 - 1699)

painted wood, copper.

5.4 cm x 44 cm

Beeltenis van de Zwarte Madonna, buste, op de binnenzijde van een rond doosje. Met een inscriptie op de binnenzijde van de deksel.

(Effigy of the Black Madonna, bust, on the inside of a round box. With an inscription on the inside of the lid.)

Image and original data provided by

Rijksmuseum, Amsterdam

(via medievalpoc)

medievalpoc:

skemono submitted to medievalpoc:
Unknown Artist
A Black Servant
England (ca. 1760-1770)
Oil on canvas, 63.5x76.2 cm
From the site Historical Portraits:

This portrait of a black servant in an interior is an interesting example of a humane and sensitive characterisation as a servant as an individual, rather than as a an extra in their master’s lives. Black servants in particular appear in earlier decades as accoutrements of fashionable life, but here the young boy is shown with character and insight, and was clearly a favoured companion among servants. His intimate position in his master or more probably mistress’s household is shown by the fact that he is cupbearer, and trusted and loved by their lapdog.

[X]

medievalpoc:

skemono submitted to medievalpoc:

Unknown Artist

A Black Servant

England (ca. 1760-1770)

Oil on canvas, 63.5x76.2 cm

From the site Historical Portraits:

This portrait of a black servant in an interior is an interesting example of a humane and sensitive characterisation as a servant as an individual, rather than as a an extra in their master’s lives. Black servants in particular appear in earlier decades as accoutrements of fashionable life, but here the young boy is shown with character and insight, and was clearly a favoured companion among servants. His intimate position in his master or more probably mistress’s household is shown by the fact that he is cupbearer, and trusted and loved by their lapdog.

[X]

sapta-loka:

✨ after the sunset ✨

(via penthesileas)

“Who taught me to suck in my stomach,
or my cheeks?
Who told me to stand with my legs apart
and my hips thrust back
to create the illusion of a gap
between my thighs?
Who made me believe that the most beautiful part of me
is my negative space?”

—   

Negative Space (via elliesigh)

this post.

(via methpool)

(Source: , via fandomsandfeminism)