My Heart

this is a map of my heart
the land of my father
my mothers world
treat it kindly read it with care
you can do a lot of damage here

febricant:

sixpenceee:

Displayed in the Saint-Étienne church in France is the figure of René de Chalon, Prince of Orange. The prince died at the young age of 25 during the siege of Saint-Dizier in 1544. 
Rather then memorialize him in the standard hero form, his wife requested (or René himself requested, or possibly both) that he be shown as “not a standard figure but a life-size skeleton with strips of dried skin flapping over a hollow carcass, whose right hand clutches at the empty rib cage while the left hand holds high his heart in a grand gesture.” (Source)

Goth power couple

febricant:

sixpenceee:

Displayed in the Saint-Étienne church in France is the figure of René de Chalon, Prince of Orange. The prince died at the young age of 25 during the siege of Saint-Dizier in 1544.

Rather then memorialize him in the standard hero form, his wife requested (or René himself requested, or possibly both) that he be shown as “not a standard figure but a life-size skeleton with strips of dried skin flapping over a hollow carcass, whose right hand clutches at the empty rib cage while the left hand holds high his heart in a grand gesture.” (Source)

Goth power couple

Keaton Henson - Flesh and Bone

And I am more than this frame,

I feel hurt and I feel shame

I just wish you would feel the same

And I am more than these bones

I feel love, I feel alone

I just wish you would come home

(Source: mercuryisinretrograde, via proserpin)

Nick Cave and the Bad Seeds - Red Right Hand

my-old-url-was-worse:

presentreign:

Everyone IN NY should read this

Everyone who wants to come to NY should read this

Everyone should read this if you’re thinking about NY in any way, shape or form.

So fucking true. Everyone who lives/visits New York should be required to read these. ESPECIALLY the one about staying to the right on the stairs. Do you want to me to fucking kill you???

(Source: jessehimself, via nanoochka)

i want a word for the almost-home.

that point where the highway’s monotony becomes familiar
that subway stop whose name will always wake you from day’s-end dozing
that first glimpse of the skyline
that you never loved until you left it behind.

what do you call the exit sign you see even in your dreams?
is there a name for the airport terminal you come back to,
comfortably exhausted?

i need a word for rounding your corner onto your street,
for seeing your city on the horizon,
for flying homewards down your highway.

give me a word for the boundary
between the world you went to see
and the small one you call your own.

i want a word for the moment you know
you’re almost home.

—   there and back again, n.m.h.  (via running-from-infinity)

(via starksandrecreation)

For instance, the World Bank is essentially an American instrument, and the United States is a food-surplus nation threatened with loss of foreign markets for farm products as modernization of European agriculture proceeds. For the World Bank to finance such institutional reforms in developing nations as would lead them toward self-sufficiency on food account would run counter to American interests. U.S. farm surpluses would become unmanageable as the overseas market for U.S. farm products dwindled. Hence, the World Bank prefers perpetuation of world poverty to the development of adequate overseas capacity to feed the peoples of developing countries.

There is a yet more subtle point to be considered. Mineral resources represent diminishing assets. It is in the interest of developing peoples to conserve such assets for their own ultimate use in manufacturing industries, as these develop within the borders of nations rich in raw materials but backward in general development. In the short run such domestic use of mineral resources is not possible because of inadequate industrial capital and consumer markets place. The specter is thus raised that in the long run these countries will find themselves depleted of resources as World Bank programs accelerate the exploitation of their mineral deposits for use by other nations.

The long-term prospect is thus for these countries to be unable to earn foreign exchange on export account sufficient to finance their required food imports. The World Bank has foreseen this. Its proposals for population limitation in these countries is a cold-blooded attempt to extort from them their mineral resources, without assuming responsibility for the sustenance of these peoples once the industrialized West has stripped them of their fuel and mineral deposits.

Consider the alternative, that World Bank loans and technical assistance foster agricultural self-sufficiency among these peoples. Assume substantial success in this endeavor in, say, a decade. Thereafter, exportation of fuels and minerals would become a matter of choice by these peoples, not a necessity. Such export might continue at current levels; it might increase, or it might diminish. The decision to conserve or to dissipate exhaustible resources would be autonomous, a matter of choice by these peoples and their governments, not something imposed upon them from outside. The decision about desirable levels of population also would be a local matter, not something demanded among the terms on which capital resources are obtained from foreign suppliers. The peoples now dependent would escape that trap. This is not intended or desired either by the World Bank or by the government of the United States and its client regimes….

Excessive industrialization in the United States, coupled with increasingly wasteful uses of resources on armaments and on personal luxuries that are essentially trivial in terms of human well-being, makes essential the U.S. exploitation of the developing countries, their resources and peoples. The United States is in deficit on raw-materials account, but is unwilling to limit its industrial expansion correspondingly. It is in surplus on farm products account, but is unwilling to limit its agriculture accordingly. The peoples of developing countries therefore are to be turned into the instrument through which the otherwise untenable U.S. economic process is perpetuated.

—   

Michael Hudson | Super-Imperialism

jp morgan fired him for writing this stuff in the early 70s

(via antoine-roquentin)

(via cultureofresistance)

“Just because you fell in love with the river
doesn’t mean you must feed it your bones.”

—   Jeanann Verlee, “Polyamory, with Knives,” published in Nailed Magazine (via bostonpoetryslam)

(via villainessy)

medievalpoc:

Anonymous Sculptor (Venice)

Portrait Bust of a Man

Italy (early 16th Century)

Polychromed Bronze, 27.9 cm. (H) [Bust of a black man wearing a doublet, a soft cap with a tassle, and earrings.]

Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, Department of Western Art.

nuuro:

Barbara Baldi

“I wouldn’t necessarily mind people not knowing I’m gay, but I don’t like being thought of as straight — in the same way that I don’t mind people not knowing I’m a writer, but it would be awkward if they assumed I was an extreme skateboarder, because that’s so far removed from the reality of my life. But there is no blank slate where orientation is concerned; we are straight until proven otherwise. And if you’ve never seen how dramatically a conversation can be derailed by a casual admission of homosexuality, let me tell you, it gets awkward.”

—   

My Life as an Invisible Queer (via feministlibrarian)

too fuckin real

like

i couldn’t care less whether you know what my sexuality is but when you assume incorrectly?? That pisses me off like no other

(via mylifeisborromean)

(via penthesileas)

beautiful-belgium:

VICTOR HORTA, Main hall and staircase of the Aubecq residence, Avenue Louise, Brussels (demolished), 1899–1903. Musée Horta, Saint-Gilles (Brussels), Fondation Jean et Renée Delhaye — © Photo: Musée Horta, Saint-Gilles (Brussels)

beautiful-belgium:

VICTOR HORTAMain hall and staircase of the Aubecq residence, Avenue Louise, Brussels (demolished), 1899–1903. Musée Horta, Saint-Gilles (Brussels), Fondation Jean et Renée Delhaye — © Photo: Musée Horta, Saint-Gilles (Brussels)

(via penthesileas)